WEST NILE VIRUS FOUND IN MOSQUITOES IN MERIDEN

Public Health Notice:

WEST NILE VIRUS FOUND IN MOSQUITOES IN MERIDEN

 

(August 23, 2021) - The State Mosquito Management Program notified the Meriden Department of Health and Human Services that the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) has identified West Nile Virus (WNV) infected mosquitoes in Meriden.

 

“I ask everyone to prevent mosquito bites by eliminating standing water around your home, making sure your door and window screens are in good repair, and covering bare skin and using insect repellent when outside – especially at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active”, says Lea Crown, Director of Health and Human Services.

 

While most people infected with West Nile virus do not develop any symptoms, about 1 in 5 people develop a fever with other symptoms such as headache, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, diarrhea, or rash. Most people with this type of West Nile virus disease recover completely, but fatigue and weakness can last for weeks or months. Some populations, such as those persons over 60 and those with certain medical conditions, can develop a more severe illness affecting the central nervous system such as encephalitis or meningitis. Symptoms of severe illness include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. See your healthcare provider if you develop the symptoms described above.

 

To reduce the risk of being bitten by mosquitoes, the Meriden Department of Health and Human Service recommends that residents should:

  • Minimize time spent outdoors between dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Be sure door and window screens are tight fitting and in good repair.
  • Wear shoes, socks, long pants, and a long-sleeved shirt when outdoors for long periods, or when mosquitoes are most active. Clothing should be light colored and made of tightly woven materials that keep mosquitoes away from the skin.
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in an unscreened structure and to protect small babies when outdoors.
  • Consider the use of mosquito repellent, according to directions, when it is necessary to be outdoors. Follow the instructions for application on the product.

 

For information on West Nile Virus and how to prevent mosquito bites, visit the Connecticut Mosquito Management Program Web site at www.ct.gov/mosquito. For more information on mosquito surveillance visit the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station website at https://portal.ct.gov/CAES.

 

Contact: Lea Crown, Director of Health and Human Services, 203-630-4221

               Scott Bryden, Environmental Health Administrator, 203-630-4226

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